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‘Global Cooling’ Debunked

February 6, 2010

Further to my previous post on the argument that assertions of ‘recent global cooling’ is a gross misrepresentation of the data, Joe Romm has this sourced graphic from UAH monthly satellite data, coming from climatologist and former NASA scientist, Dr Roy Spencer,

Dr Spencer notes that,

“The global-average lower tropospheric temperature anomaly soared to +0.72 deg. C in January, 2010. This is the warmest January in the 32-year satellite-based data record.”

You see? 1998 was an unusually hot el nino effect but it doesn’t obscure the upward trend of recent decades and even the last few years. In fact, even despite the recent cold-snap in the North, it appears that the global average temperature was hot enough to net out this effect. Being cautious, however, Dr Spencer says:

“This record warmth will seem strange to those who have experienced an unusually cold winter. While I have not checked into this, my first guess is that the atmospheric general circulation this winter has become unusually land-locked, allowing cold air masses to intensify over the major Northern Hemispheric land masses more than usual. Note this ALSO means that not as much cold air is flowing over and cooling the ocean surface compared to normal. Nevertheless, we will double check our calculations to make sure we have not make some sort of Y2.01K error (insert smiley). I will also check the AMSR-E sea surface temperatures, which have also been running unusually warm.

“We don’t hide the data or use tricks, folks…it is what it is.”

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